3.1 C
London
Saturday, November 27, 2021

Blackhawks’ ‘John Doe’ revealed as Kyle Beach

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

Speaking in an emotional interview with TSN Wednesday night, the player referred to as John Doe in the investigation into sexual assault allegations involving the Chicago Blackhawks revealed himself as Kyle Beach.

Beach spoke with in a 1-on-1 with reporter Rick Westhead a day after Blackhawks president of hockey operations Stan Bowman resigned after investigators released their findings on how the team handled the allegations against former video coach Brad Aldrich during the 2010 Stanley Cup run.

Beach, who through his attorney Monday said he was “grateful for the accountability” shown by the Blackhawks, opened up in detail about his process and experience on TSN, overcoming tears and often struggling to maintain his composure.

“Yesterday was … I have many emotions,” he said. “I cried, I smiled, I laughed, I cried some more. My girlfriend and I, we didn’t know how to think. She has been my rock through this process. And I’m fortunate to have her here.

“I have a great feeling of relief, and vindication. I really felt like there were lies told. And it was important and special to have the truth come out.”

According to the lawsuit, filed in May 2021 by Beach, Aldrich sexually assaulted him and another player in 2010.

In June, the Blackhawks commissioned an independent law firm, Jenner & Block, to conduct a full investigation. That investigation was led by Reid Schar, a former assistant U.S. attorney, and the results were handed over to the Blackhawks organization on Monday.

In 2010, Beach was called up by Chicago as a practice player during the postseason, as he moved closer to attaining his lifelong goal of playing in the NHL.

“Just to be a part of that for the first time, it was an extremely special moment for me and my family and the next step for me to pursue my NHL dream,” he said. “Unfortunately, a few weeks later, the memories were shattered and my life was changed forever.”

The Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup that season, defeating the Philadelphia Flyers in the final round, and Aldrich remained on staff throughout, including the team’s celebrations. Beach spoke emotionally about that time, and seeing Aldrich from afar.

“The only way to describe it, was I felt sick, sick to my stomach,” he said. “Nothing happened. His life was the same as it was the day before. To see him with the team, with the Stanley Cup. It made me feel like nothing. Like I didn’t exist. It made me feel like I wasn’t important.

“It made me feel like he was right, and I was wrong.”

It was feelings like those — and the chase of his dream to make the NHL — that kept Beach silent for so many years.

“I did what I had to do to survive, to continue to pursue my dream,” he said. “So I didn’t talk about it.”

- Advertisement -
Latest news

Christmas shopping: check out the best ways to pay

Buying festive gifts used to be so simple but the march of technology, Covid and other factors have shaken things up and led to...
- Advertisement -

Will Rivian’s electric vehicles end Detroit’s reign over the US auto industry?

Normal, Illinois, a town of just 55,000 people, could be the future of car manufacturing, according to Wall Street traders, at least. Six hours’...

‘Taste this, it’s salty’: how rising seas are ruining the Gambia’s rice farmers

In the sweltering heat of the late-morning west African sun, Aminata Jamba slashes at golden rice stalks with a sickle. “The rice is lovely,”...

What links the Bosphorus with the Bering Strait? The Saturday quiz

The questions1 What was stolen from China by botanist Robert Fortune?2 Which palace is known as the Viennese Versailles?3 Carolyn Shoemaker found 32 examples...
Related news

Christmas shopping: check out the best ways to pay

Buying festive gifts used to be so simple but the march of technology, Covid and other factors have shaken things up and led to...

Will Rivian’s electric vehicles end Detroit’s reign over the US auto industry?

Normal, Illinois, a town of just 55,000 people, could be the future of car manufacturing, according to Wall Street traders, at least. Six hours’...

‘Taste this, it’s salty’: how rising seas are ruining the Gambia’s rice farmers

In the sweltering heat of the late-morning west African sun, Aminata Jamba slashes at golden rice stalks with a sickle. “The rice is lovely,”...

What links the Bosphorus with the Bering Strait? The Saturday quiz

The questions1 What was stolen from China by botanist Robert Fortune?2 Which palace is known as the Viennese Versailles?3 Carolyn Shoemaker found 32 examples...
- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here